FY 2025

COSSA’s Analysis of the President’s FY 2025 Budget Request for Social and Behavioral Science

On March 11, the Biden Administration transmitted its fiscal year (FY) 2025 budget request to Congress. The FY 2025 budget was released while Congress was still working to finalize its annual appropriations bills for FY 2024 (the fiscal year that began October 1, 2023). The FY 2024 appropriations process was completed on March 22 with the passage of a second omnibus package (see related article). The first package was passed on March 8. As COSSA has been reporting over the last several months, the FY 2024 appropriations bills were bound by strict budget caps that were agreed to in January (although the same deal was floated much earlier…

Congress Works to Finalize FY 2024 Budget, Looking Forward to FY 2025

The first six of the twelve annual appropriations bills for fiscal year (FY) 2024 were passed by Congress and signed into law by President Biden last week. As previously reported, this included funding for the National Science Foundation, Census Bureau, National Institute of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, and other federal agencies and departments. The bills resulted in funding cuts across all agencies, including the National Science Foundation which received an 8.2 percent cut from FY 2023. COSSA’s in-depth analysis for these bills can be found here. The remaining six bills have a deadline of Friday, March 22, leaving only a…

Congress Balances FY 2024 Budget and Supplemental Funding Package as CR Deadline Approaches

As previously reported, Congress is slowly inching closer to the end of their continuing resolution (CR) that expires on tiered deadlines in the first two weeks of March. While House Appropriations subcommittees have received their allocations for their respective bills, it’s still unclear whether Congress will produce the required twelve bills by the deadlines, produce a large or partial omnibus package, or extend the current CR. In past weeks, Congress has been working to pass a National Security supplemental funding package to provide aid to Ukraine, Israel, and the border crisis. However, this bill has been highly contentious and, while…

OPPORTUNITY: FY 2025 Funding Request for NIH

COSSA, a member of the steering committee of the Ad Hoc Group for Medical Research, has signed on in support of a funding request of “at least $51.303 billion” for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in fiscal year (FY) 2025. The request would represent a $3.579 billion or 7.5% increase over the level included in the Senate bill for FY 2024. Other organizations wishing to lend their support to the NIH funding request for FY 2025 are encouraged to sign-on by March 1. 

Congress Inches Toward FY 2024 Conclusion

As we move further into the fiscal year (FY), lawmakers on Capitol Hill continue to work toward finalizing appropriations for FY 2024. As previously reported, Congress pushed its deadline to complete the FY 2024 bills until March, leaving just a few weeks to find agreement across the 12 annual appropriations bills and pass them in each chamber. After months of stalemate, reports suggest that the end may be in sight now that leadership has agreed to top-line funding levels for discretionary spending. COSSA recently issued an action alert calling on the research community to contact their elected offices to urge the highest possible funding levels…

Congress Narrowly Passes CR to Extend Funding to March

As reported by COSSA, Congress previously passed two stop-gap measures to allow additional time to complete the fiscal year (FY) 2024 appropriations bills. On January 18, the day before the last continuing resolution (CR) deadline, the House and Senate struck a deal to extend funding to March. Like the previous CR, the new stop-gap measure includes “tiered deadlines” for the unpassed spending bills. The deadline for the first tranche of bills (the Military Construction-VA, Agriculture, Energy-Water and Transportation-HUD bills) has been extended to March 1. The remaining bills (including Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Commerce, Justice Science, which…

White House Releases FY 2025 Budget Priorities for R&D

On August 17, the White House released a memorandum outlining the Administration’s priorities for research and development (R&D) for the fiscal year (FY) 2025 budget cycle. This memorandum, which is traditionally released annually by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP), aims to set cross-cutting priorities for all federal research agencies to consider as they develop their budget submissions. The FY 2025 memorandum lists seven such priorities for agencies to consider: While the priorities listed are similar to those in the White House R&D memorandum for FY 2024, there is notably more…

Debt Ceiling Deal Caps Funding for Two Years, House Seeks Additional Cuts

As previously reported, the White House and House Republican leadership agreed to a budget deal late last month that would keep the U.S. from defaulting on its debt, at least until after the 2024 elections. The agreement, passed by Congress as the Fiscal Responsibility Act of 2023 (H.R. 3746), suspends the federal debt ceiling until January 2025. However, as Republicans have been demanding, the suspension comes with stiff caps on discretionary spending for the next two years. In effect, the caps are likely to result in flat funding for federal research agencies in fiscal year (FY) 2024, with perhaps a few exceptions for…

Debt Limit Deal Struck, Spending Caps Likely for FY 2024-25

Over the Memorial Day weekend, the White House and House Republican leadership agreed to a budget deal that would keep the U.S. from defaulting on its debt, at least until after the 2024 elections. The agreement would suspend the U.S. debt limit until January 2025. However, as Republicans have been demanding, the suspension would come with limits—as well as some cuts—to discretionary spending over the next two years.     Should it make it through the House and Senate, the deal would set caps on discretionary spending at levels roughly 5 percent or $40 billion below current levels. However, by reclaiming unobligated…

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