why social science

Justice Research and Statistics Agency Leaders Answer “Why Social Science”

This month’s Why Social Science post comes from National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Director Nancy La Vigne and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) Director Alexis Piquero, who discuss what we know about ensuring school safety and what we can do to prevent mass shootings in schools. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science” Examines the Necessary Conditions for Passing Bipartisan Gun Legislation

This month’s Why Social Science Post comes from The Conversation, where Monica L. McDermott and David R. Jones examine how and why the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act passed now after three decades of unsuccessful attempts to pass gun reform legislation. Read it here and subscribe. This month’s Why Social Science Post comes from The Conversation, where Monica L. McDermott and David R. Jones examine how and why the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act passed now after three decades of unsuccessful attempts to pass gun reform legislation. Read it here and subscribe.

Harel Shapira & American Sociological Association Answer “Why Social Science” Can Shed Light on How People Perceive Guns

This month, as part of COSSA’s ongoing Why Social Science? series on gun violence, we share a video produced by the American Sociological Association, a COSSA governing member.  Are guns weapons or tools? It depends who you ask. Dr. Harel Shapira of the University of Texas at Austin explains how gun owners are socialized to view guns as tools for self-defense.  

COSSA Running “Why Social Science” Series Spotlighting Research on Gun Violence

Friends, The statistics surrounding gun violence in America are staggering and the policy solutions varied. Recent tragedies in Uvalde, TX and at a grocery store in my hometown of Buffalo, NY—not to mention the countless other shootings that have occurred since then—underscore just how pervasive this crisis is, regardless of where you live. The institutions long-considered “safe spaces”—schools, hospitals, houses of worship—are no longer safe from the scourge of gun violence. Mass shooting events are just one piece of this social and public health crisis. Everyday across the country families and communities are being rocked by gun violence, from suicide…

University of Michigan’s Rebecca Cunningham Answers “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Science? post comes from Rebecca Cunningham, M.D., who writes about the role social scientists may play in reducing firearm injury through advising on policy changes and building an evidence base. The post is the first in a series spotlighting research on gun violence and firearm injury in the Why Social Science catalog. Read the post here.

NCFR President Norma J. Bond Burgess Answers “Why Social Science?”

Participants Reflect on Social Science Advocacy Day to Answer “Why Social Science?”

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from three participants from this year’s Social Science Advocacy Day who reflect upon their advocacy experiences and the importance of advocating for the social sciences.

APA’s Corbin Evans Answers “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Science? post comes from Corbin Evans, Senior Director of Congressional and Federal Relations at the American Psychological Association, who writes about human behavior and its relationship to the changing climate.

Smithsonian Ambassador-at-Large Richard Kurin Answers “Why Social Science?”

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from Richard Kurin, Distinguished Scholar & Ambassador at Large at the Smithsonian Institution, who writes about the role social science plays in protecting and preserving cultural heritage.

SSRC President Anna Harvey Answers “Why Social Science?”

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from Anna Harvey, President of the Social Science Research Council (SSRC), who writes about a new SSRC initiative to combat health mis- and disinformation.

“Why Social Science” Can Help Us Learn Self-Compassion

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from social psychologist Yuki Miyagawa of Otemon Gakuin University in Osaka, who writes about his research on learning self-compassion, which can help us become more resilient individuals.

“Why Social Science” Matters for AI Research

The latest Why Social Science? post comes from Corinna Turbes, Policy Director for the Data Foundation, who writes about the need for better data to enable social scientists to conduct artificial intelligence (AI) research.

CommuniVax Coalition Answers “Why Social Science”

The latest Why Social Science? post comes from a group of anthropologists on behalf of the CommuniVax Coalition, an alliance of social scientists, public health experts, and community advocates working to strengthen COVID-19 vaccination efforts in the United States, particularly in communities of color.

“Why Social Science” Can Help Plan for Returning to In-Person Work

The latest Why Social Science? post comes from Sunita Sah, of the University of Cambridge, who writes about how understanding anxiety and decision-making can help organizations plan for returning to the office while minimizing their employees’ anxiety. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science?” Looks at Trans Activism and Linguistics

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from sociolinguist Aris Keshav who writes about the contributions trans activists have made to linguistics, and how engaging with trans activism can help shape the way we think about language. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science?” Focuses on Combatting Hate and Discrimination Against Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders

The latest Why Social Science? guest post comes from Kevin Carriere, Assistant Professor of Psychology at Washington & Jefferson College, who writes about how insights from the social sciences can be used to help overcome biases and stereotypes against Asian Americans. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science?” Can Help Us Communicate Numbers

The latest Why Social Science? post comes from Ellen Peters, Director of the University of Oregon’s Center for Science Communication Research, who writes about ways policymakers can communicate numbers and statistics in ways that enhance—rather than diminish—the public’s understanding. Read it here and subscribe.

John Anderson, NAE President, Answers “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Science? comes from John Anderson, President of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), who writes about the importance of collaboration between engineers and social scientists. Read it here and subscribe.

Why Social Science? Celebrates Anthropology Day

The latest Why Social Science? post highlights Anthropology Day, which the American Anthropological Association (AAA) celebrates every February. Anthropology Day is a day for anthropologists to celebrate and share their discipline with the public around them. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science?” Focuses on COVID-19 Vaccination

The latest Why Social Science? post comes from the authors of the recent National Institutes of Health (NIH) report “COVID-19 Vaccination Communication: Applying Behavioral and Social Science to Address Vaccine Hesitancy and Foster Vaccine Confidence,” who write about the evidence-informed best practices communities should use when sharing information about the vaccination process for COVID-19. Read it here and subscribe.

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