why social science

John T. Jost and Daniela Goya-Tocchetto Answer “Why Social Science?”

This month’s Why Social Science? post comes from Dr. John T. Jost (New York University) and Dr. Daniela Goya-Tocchetto (University of Buffalo) who discuss political polarization and the future of American democracy. Read on for more.

2024 Social Science Advocates Answer “Why Social Science?” 

This month’s Why Social Science? post comes from three participants from this year’s Social Science Advocacy Day who reflected upon their advocacy experiences and the importance of advocating for the social sciences.  Read on for more. 

Carlotta Arthur and Emanuel Robinson from NASEM Answer “Why Social Science?”

The most recent Why Social Science? post comes from Carlotta Arthur and Emanuel Robinson from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) who discuss how the social and behavioral sciences are poised to inform and improve AI and AI systems. Read on for more.

Camille Gamboa from Sage Answers “Why Social Science?

The recent Why Social Science? post comes from Camille Gamboa from Sage who interviews Euan Adie, Overton’s managing director, to learn more about the large impact that social science makes on policy and his work creating tools to connect the scholarly and policy worlds. Read on for more.

Dr. Monica N. Feit from the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) Answers “Why Social Science?”

The recent Why Social Science? post comes from Dr. Monica N. Feit from the Health and Medicine Division of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) who writes about how social science can provide valuable expertise to help inform better health research.  Read on for more.

Dr. Rayvon Fouché from Northwestern University Answers “Why Social Science?”

The recent Why Social Science? post comes from Dr. Rayvon Fouché from Northwestern University who writes about how social science can provide valuable history, context, and interpretive perspectives to help inform our societies moving forward. Read on for more.

White House Announces the Establishment of Office of Gun Violence Prevention

On September 22, the Biden Administration announced the establishment of the first-ever White House Office of Gun Violence Prevention. The office is expected to accelerate executive action and prioritize legislation that reduces gun violence in the United States. During the announcement, the Biden Administration stressed the importance of confronting the issue in a timely manner, highlighting the administration’s ongoing efforts to expand gun violence prevention, including the passage of the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act in 2022. The priorities of the office include: For more information on how social science research can be used to create evidence-based policy for gun violence prevention, visit COSSA’s blog, “Why Social…

Dr. Mark Chan and Dr. Dennis P. Stolle from APA Answer “Why Social Science?”

This month’s Why Social Science? post comes from Dr. Mark Chan and Dr. Dennis P. Stolle from the American Psychological Association who write about the importance of a psychologically healthy workplace.  Read on for more.

Researchers from York St John University Answer “Why Social Science?”

The most recent Why Social Science? post comes from The Conversation, where Dr. Clare Cunningham, Dr. Catherine Heinemeyer, and Dr. Jude Parks write about how social and behavioral science can help students find their place in fighting climate change. Read on for more.

Dr. Amy Burke and Julia Milton from the NCSES Answer “Why Social Science?”

The most recent Why Social Science? post comes from Dr. Amy Burke and Julia Milton from the National Center for Science and Engineering Statistics (NCSES) at the National Science Foundation (NSF) who write about representation in the STEM workforce. Read on for more.

Social Science Advocates Answers “Why Social Science?”

The most recent Why Social Science? post comes from three participants from this year’s Social Science Advocacy Day who reflected upon their experiences and the importance of advocating for the social sciences. Read on for more.

Gun Violence Researchers Answer “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Science? post comes from researchers at the University of Connecticut and Johns Hopkins University to touch on the many ways social science offers insights into preventing and reducing the prevalence of gun-related violence. Read on for more.

Civil Engineers & Applied Behavioral Scientists Answer “Why Social Science” Can Make Workplaces Safer

“Why Social Science” Discusses the Science Behind Elections and Polling

This week’s Why Social Science? post comes from Kathy Frankovic, former Director of Surveys at CBS News and former President of the American Association for Public Opinion Research (AAPOR), who writes about the science behind public opinion polling and its role in predicting the outcome of elections.

Justice Research and Statistics Agency Leaders Answer “Why Social Science”

This month’s Why Social Science post comes from National Institute of Justice (NIJ) Director Nancy La Vigne and Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) Director Alexis Piquero, who discuss what we know about ensuring school safety and what we can do to prevent mass shootings in schools. Read it here and subscribe.

“Why Social Science” Examines the Necessary Conditions for Passing Bipartisan Gun Legislation

This month’s Why Social Science Post comes from The Conversation, where Monica L. McDermott and David R. Jones examine how and why the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act passed now after three decades of unsuccessful attempts to pass gun reform legislation. Read it here and subscribe. This month’s Why Social Science Post comes from The Conversation, where Monica L. McDermott and David R. Jones examine how and why the Bipartisan Safer Communities Act passed now after three decades of unsuccessful attempts to pass gun reform legislation. Read it here and subscribe.

Harel Shapira & American Sociological Association Answer “Why Social Science” Can Shed Light on How People Perceive Guns

This month, as part of COSSA’s ongoing Why Social Science? series on gun violence, we share a video produced by the American Sociological Association, a COSSA governing member.  Are guns weapons or tools? It depends who you ask. Dr. Harel Shapira of the University of Texas at Austin explains how gun owners are socialized to view guns as tools for self-defense.  

COSSA Running “Why Social Science” Series Spotlighting Research on Gun Violence

Friends, The statistics surrounding gun violence in America are staggering and the policy solutions varied. Recent tragedies in Uvalde, TX and at a grocery store in my hometown of Buffalo, NY—not to mention the countless other shootings that have occurred since then—underscore just how pervasive this crisis is, regardless of where you live. The institutions long-considered “safe spaces”—schools, hospitals, houses of worship—are no longer safe from the scourge of gun violence. Mass shooting events are just one piece of this social and public health crisis. Everyday across the country families and communities are being rocked by gun violence, from suicide…

University of Michigan’s Rebecca Cunningham Answers “Why Social Science?”

This week’s Why Social Science? post comes from Rebecca Cunningham, M.D., who writes about the role social scientists may play in reducing firearm injury through advising on policy changes and building an evidence base. The post is the first in a series spotlighting research on gun violence and firearm injury in the Why Social Science catalog. Read the post here.

NCFR President Norma J. Bond Burgess Answers “Why Social Science?”

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